Building a new CS dual-credit course

I offer dual-credit courses for juniors and seniors.  These are fully accredited courses from University of Montana that I teach on my high school campus.  The kids are fully registered UM students and will receive a UM transcript.  The kids get the grade on their transcript that they get in my course.  No big final like an AP course.  It is a nice setup for them and me.  My course simply has to fit the broad requirements of the UM course.  I do not have to use the UM book or follow the exact UM course plan.  At the moment we offer four dual credit courses: Pre-calc, Stats, CSCI 100 (general credit) and CSCI 135 (CS credit).  The CSCI 100 used to be an intro to Python course with the CSCI 135 being a hard-core Java course.  The university just revamped these two courses.  The CSCI 100 is now a programming survey course, seven “languages” in the semester, and the CSCI 135 is a Python course.  Changing the CSCI 135 was not a big deal for me.  I just renumber my CSCI 100 course to CSCI 135.  My old CSCI 100 Python course was a year long so I did more than the university’s old CSCI 100 by a long shot.  My course now matches their new CSCI 135.  Sweet.  The university’s new CSCI 100 on the other hand will be a completely new course.  I talked to the CSCI 100 instructor (a friend of mine) who rebuilt and teaches the course.  His course consists of these seven topics:

  1. Code.org – fundamentals of DnD programming
  2. Scratch – simple coding in DnD
  3. Studio Code – mobile apps
  4. Alice – stories and interactive animations
  5. HTML – a basic web site
  6. Processing – visual programming
  7. Python

He also sent me his assignments for the semester.  After a quick look I decided his material would be perfect for the seniors looking at an education degree and have no programming experience.  Not so perfect for those of my students who have taken any programming from me or looking at going into CS.  A bit too basic.  I like the concept of the course, hitting a number of topics lightly so students have a starting point at building a tool set for programming.  I just have to redesign the course so it fits my knowledge set.  I do not know any HTML (something I should fix some day), Code.org is a bit too simple, most of my students will have seen Scratch, I am not sure what Studio Code is and I have a better idea for Processing.  OK, so I need to rewrite 90% of his course.  Not a problem, I have ideas for substitutes.

Here is my altered CSCI 100 that suits my skill set and hardware availability:

  1. Code.org – just so the students can see Code.org
  2. App Inventor – build an Android app
  3. Micro:bit – make music with DnD
  4. Alice – build a scene from Shakespeare
  5. Small Basic – intro to a simple line code language
  6. Arduino – line code and hardware (Processing is the IDE Arduino uses)
  7. Python – back to micro:bit along with some pure coding projects

Nothing earth shaking there.  I think I am hitting all the bases for a good cross section of programming tools and still providing enough rigor to justify 3 college level credits.  I have eighteen weeks to cover this material.  With some heavy math and some head scratching logic here is my time schedule:

(We have block periods so classes are 90 minutes every other day.)

  1. Course set up and Code.org – 1 week
  2. App Inventor – 2 weeks
  3. Micro:bit – 2 weeks
  4. Alice – 2 weeks
  5. Small Basic – 2 weeks
  6. Arduino – 2 weeks
  7. Python – 4 weeks

That gives me 3 weeks of slack in there.  This seems like a lot of time but I know from experience that spring semester is pure hell on the seniors.  Sports, senior projects, college visits, extended spring breaks and general weird events really cut into the spring semester.  If I see extra time looming there are several other topics I can pull up in a hurry; Unity, Code Combat, or just flesh out some of the previous topics that were of special interest.

My biggest issue will be to have good assignments ready to go.  Some, maybe all, of the seniors will be doing this course independent study or with minimum supervision.  I have to have things laid out for them in a manner that will minimize confusion.  In a classroom setting confusion is minimized on the fly, no so with independent study.  So for this first offering I am being very select as to who I allow take the course.  I need the students that can think for themselves, not get hung up when something does not work out perfectly and give helpful feedback.  I have already eliminated one prospective student.  She asked if the course was going to be hard because she did not want any hard courses her senior year.  Good luck in college.

I really hope I can get five or six students to sign up for the course.  I think it will be a fun experience for them and for me.

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